IsoKinetic Breathing Exercise : OrganicMD
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IsoKinetic Breathing Exercise

Useful to reduce stress, and shift you towards a more parasympathetic dominant state. Do before bed, or if anxious. Useful if you are having an exacerbation of asthma, or an allergic response. 2 to 4 minutes of this will make you more alkaline, which is a positive thing.

Thanks to Joseph Siegel, who channeled this bit of wisdom from the cosmos.

“From you I receive
to you I give.
Together we share
and from this we live”
Natan

We will begin with a pattern of slow, full breathing. Breathe in through your nose, and out through your mouth. Your jaw is relaxed, and the tip of your tongue is lightly resting against the roof of your mouth. Imagine the pattern of your breathing as a large circle, with the breath in equal in time to the breath out. As you go across the top of the circle from the in breath to the out-breath, there is almost a pause, with the same pause at the bottom of the circle in the transition from the out-breath to the in-breath.

Find your own rhythm. About six breaths per minute is a good pace.

This pattern of slow, full circular breathing is itself quite relaxing. Practice it whenever you can. The goal is to be able at any instant to fall into this pattern of intentional breathing. When you’re stressed or overcome by emotion, this pattern of breathing will help keep you grounded and in your body.

The final part of this technique involves some breath holding.

Start with the pattern of slow full breathing. When you are into a comfortable rhythm, choose an in-breath and on that in-breath, breathe in as deeply as you can and hold your breath. Once you have filled your lungs with the deepest breath possible, hold your breath and relax. Relax your shoulders, relax your belly and your diaphragm and sit quietly. Hold your breath for as long as you can and then a few seconds longer. When you must exhale, exhale through your mouth. Take a few breaths until you have recovered and returned to the relaxed rhythm of full breaths

Once you have recovered, choose an out breath and breathe all of the air out of your lungs and hold your breath. Empty your lungs totally, hold your breath and relax. Relax your shoulders, relax your belly and your diaphragm and sit quietly holding your breath as long as you can and then a few seconds longer. You will feel a great vacuum inside of your chest and when you cannot hold your breath anymore, inhale through your nose. Take a few breaths until you have recovered and returned to the relaxed rhythm of full deep breaths.

This pattern, starting with the circular breath, then breathing in and holding the breath, recovering, then breathing out and holding the breath is one cycle. Do a minimum of five cycles at any given sitting. If you are having an allergic reaction, a sinus attack, anxiety or other symptoms, continue the cycles till the symptoms are gone.

Dr. Damon Miller, MD

Dr. Damon Miller, MD

Dr. Miller brings a safe and common-sense approach to modern medicine. Your best health plan is a plan for health. Just Try It.
Dr. Damon Miller, MD

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